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*Feed Updating Issue

July 17th, 2014

Update: It turns out that there was glitch in the feed from our hosting company and a software conflict with our editor that was causing a problem with our feed. The issue has been about 80% resolved. While shows are now updating and episode descriptions are clear of any “jibberish” (aka HTML code), links within the episode descriptions will not be active for now. We anticipate that this will be cleared up within the next several days and all feeds will be functioning 100% properly once again by then. In the meantime if you would like to follow any links that are mentioned in the show please find them here on our website.

July 10th, 2014

      We apparently have been having problems with the show’s feed and it has caused our episodes in some apps to stop updating. We apologize for any inconvenience and are working hard to resolve the problem. We hope to have it resolved within the next few days. Please remember that you can always subscribe to us in iTunes or check out our website at www.itnshow.com to get the very latest information and updates about our episodes and show.


Separation of Powers - Rebroadcast

Aug. 28th, 2014

The Senate recently accused the CIA of spying on staffers and their computers. They’re charges the CIA has denied for months. Last week, however, it was shown that CIA officers did in fact hack into the computers of several Senate staffers. The episode stems from a Senate Intelligence Committee investigation into the CIA’s controversial interrogation program of the 2000’s and a report, inadvertently gotten by the SCI, that seems to reveal that the program got very little valuable intelligence from the questionable methods.

In this episode we discuss the details of the incident and attempt to answer the question, why is the separation of powers so important anyway?


Give it to us Straight

Aug. 25th, 2014

     The president told us several weeks ago that the current US mission in Iraq was strictly on humanitarian grounds. He said we would be conducting airstrikes to help ethnic Yazidis who were stranded on top of a mountain escape the grasp of the extremist group ISIS who were threatening the Yazidi people with mass executions.

The humanitarian mission has largely been accomplished but airstrikes in Iraq continue. Senior administration officials have explained in recent weeks that the mission in Iraq would be a long hard slog. But if the humanitarian mission has been accomplished which mission are they referring to?

In this episode we discuss the disconnect between the stated goals of the operations in Iraq and the timeline of achieving those goals, and wonder whether we are already embroiled in another war.


Military Action - Rebroadcast

Aug. 21st, 2014

What role does shaping public opinion play in the policy making that a president or an administration wish to undertake? Can a president shape public policy if he is unable to convince the public at large of its importance or value to the country? Does that need to shape public opinion become more vital if the policy in question is military action?

There are thousands of ethnic Yazidis trapped on a mountain in northern Iraq. They are surrounded by the extremist group ISIS who is threatening them with genocide simply for being different than they are. The president has committed a small number of military personnel to rescuing them and affording them safe passage to other places. Yet the talk surrounding this mission has been largely vague. If our goal there is strictly humanitarian why isn’t the talk more concrete?

In this episode we discuss the humanitarian crisis in northern Iraq and analyze whether the administration is attempting to slowly but surely move public opinion toward greater action against ISIS in Iraq.


Speaker Cruz and Ukraine - Rebroadcast

Aug. 18th, 2014

The president has asked Congress for $3.7 billion to deal with the border crisis of unaccompanied minors coming across our southern border. The senate had proposed their own $2.7 billion bill, and the House proposed a smaller $659 million proposal which seemed headed for passage until Texas Senator Ted Cruz seemed to convince a large portion of Tea Party Republicans in the house to withdraw their support for the bill. This afternoon, house leadership, facing a lack of sufficient votes, was forced to pull the bill.

In this episode we discuss both the direct and indirect causes of the crisis and the politics involved in it as both sides of the aisle see them. We also give an update on the crisis in Ukraine, where actions have ratcheted up this week after a new round of Russian sanctions was imposed by the US and the EU. We also discuss the interesting development of Australia sending an armed police team to the crash site of #MH17. Is this something that could aggravate an already tense situation?

Carol Williams’ article on Australia sending armed police to secure the crash site of #MH17 can be found by clicking here.


Military Action by Any Other Name…

Aug. 14th, 2014

     What role does shaping public opinion play in the policy making that a president or an administration wish to undertake? Can a president shape public policy if he is unable to convince the public at large of its importance or value to the country? Does that need to shape public opinion become more vital if the policy in question is military action?

There are thousands of ethnic Yazidis trapped on a mountain in northern Iraq. They are surrounded by the extremist group ISIS who is threatening them with genocide simply for being different than they are. The president has committed a small number of military personnel to rescuing them and affording them safe passage to other places. Yet the talk surrounding this mission has been largely vague. If our goal there is strictly humanitarian why isn’t the talk more concrete?

In this episode we discuss the humanitarian crisis in northern Iraq and analyze whether the administration is attempting to slowly but surely move public opinion toward greater action against ISIS in Iraq.


We Broke It, We Own It

Aug. 11th, 2014 

     What does it mean to go to war? Is going to war saluting as a stirring rendition of God Bless America plays? Or a bumper sticker that is placed on the back of a car? Or is it more than that? Is it the loss of lives, destruction of communities and of nations and the loss of a vast amount of resources? What does it mean to win the peace? Can you ever win a war without winning the peace after military activity has ended?

This week we suddenly find ourselves back to where we were 11 years ago: engaged in military activity in Iraq. We analyze the situation, attempt to answer the questions above and discuss the reasons the costs of breaking something unfixable may be far more than any benefits to breaking it in the first place.


Separation of Powers

Aug. 7th, 2014

     The Senate recently accused the CIA of spying on staffers and their computers. They’re charges the CIA has denied for months. Last week, however, it was shown that CIA officers did in fact hack into the computers of several Senate staffers. The episode stems from a Senate Intelligence Committee investigation into the CIA’s controversial interrogation program of the 2000’s and a report, inadvertently gotten by the SCI, that seems to reveal that the program got very little valuable intelligence from the questionable methods.

In this episode we discuss the details of the incident and attempt to answer the question, why is the separation of powers so important anyway?


Trouble in the House

Aug. 4th, 2014

     The crisis on our southern border has been going on for the last couple of month now. Both the House and Senate have been struggling to come up with their own version of an emergency funding bill that the president has asked for. The vote in the House looked set to take place last Thursday before Congress adjourned for their summer recess. At the last moment several House Republicans, unhappy with the final details of the bill, pulled their support. It was a stunning setback for House leadership. House Republicans have argued that in the final analysis a bill got passed. But in a crisis where everyone agreed something needed to get done in an urgent and competent manner, is that enough?

In this episode we discuss the details of the breakdown and why both Republican leadership and Republican rank-and-file members may have needlessly contributed to the wrong-footed handling of this situation.


Speaker Cruz, Ukraine and More…

July 31st, 2014

     The president has asked Congress for $3.7 billion to deal with the border crisis of unaccompanied minors coming across our southern border. The senate had proposed their own $2.7 billion bill, and the House proposed a smaller $659 million proposal which seemed headed for passage until Texas Senator Ted Cruz seemed to convince a large portion of Tea Party Republicans in the house to withdraw their support for the bill. This afternoon, house leadership, facing a lack of sufficient votes, was forced to pull the bill.

In this episode we discuss both the direct and indirect causes of the crisis and the politics involved in it as both sides of the aisle see them. We also give an update on the crisis in Ukraine, where actions have ratcheted up this week after a new round of Russian sanctions was imposed by the US and the EU. We also discuss the interesting development of Australia sending an armed police team to the crash site of #MH17. Is this something that could aggravate an already tense situation?

Carol Williams’ article on Australia sending armed police to secure the crash site of #MH17 can be found by clicking here.


President John Wayne

July 28th, 2014

     Recent events throughout the world have tested America’s influence over world events and the extent to which we can influence them. There has been a lot of the criticism of both action taken and action not taken, most of which has fallen squarely on President Obama’s shoulders. The president’s opponents have accused him of being cowardly and leading from behind, for example. Are these legitimate criticisms? Are there actions the US can take in these conflicts that will both show our resolve and keep them from escalating further? Or have this administration’s strategies been more sound than they appear?

In this episode we discuss the Obama administration’s role in global crisis such as Ukraine and Syria and whether or not the criticisms of them are justified. We also pose the larger question, just how do Americans like their presidents?


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